Sydney’s TV Disposal Epidemic

Tv Disposal follows , that most people at some point will want to upgrade to the latest flat screen TV, or their old TV will finally take its last fizzled breath and decide it doesn’t want to turn on anymore. Purchasing that new TV will feel great, with a super wide screen and surround sound, staying in has never been so much fun!

But what happens to the old TV? Will you give that any though to Tv Disposal ? The majority of people won’t, and that’s why it’s in danger of becoming a problem. According to experts, old TVs contain toxic chemicals like lead, mercury, cadmium and much more. These chemicals can be hazardous to human and environmental health, and should be dealt with safely.

What Should I Do With My Old TV?

The question is; what should you do with your old TV or computer to dispose of it safely? It’s a rapidly changing and ever growing area of waste, growing three times faster than any other waste in Australia. Let’s take a look at the options;

Recycling

–        Give your local waste disposal company a call (like the Rubbish Taxi!). Don’t just leave your old TV on the curb as trash, this is illegal and if you get caught you will receive a hefty fine. Depending on where you live, your local company will have its own protocol, best to give them a call. They may have specific drop off and pick up points, where your old electronics will get taken to be recycled.

–        Locate a local recycling scheme. Finding your local recycling scheme could be the way to go. Many will offer to pick up the item, which is extremely handy as computers and TVs tend to be very heavy! If you contact http://rubbishtaxi.com.au/, we are experts at doing everything we can to avoid landfills.

–        Contact your local electronics store. Many stores will take on your old electronics as they may be able to refurbish them, or use the parts for other things. Some may even pay you cash!

–        Return the old TV to the manufacturer. Your best bet is to research the manufacturer online, and read up on their guidelines for recycling. They may have designated drop off points or may collect for a fee.

 Sell or Up cycle

–        You could sell your TV in the newspaper, at a garage sale or to a friend. If it still works well, you can make back a little bit of cash.

–        These days up cycled goods are all the rage. A local company with an eye for regeneration might want your old TV to turn it into something new and saleable. Vintage products are also booming — your TV could be worth something depending on where and when it was made. Make sure you do some research.

National Television and Computer Recycling Scheme

This scheme is a free recycling service, funded and run by the television and computer industry, and regulated by the Australian Government. All companies who manufacture computers or TVs are required to join, and partner with existing recycling services or hold periodic take back events.

There will be varying recycling services and drop off points, depending on your area. It’s best to check with your local council or management centre to see where your nearest one is.

The aims of the scheme are to increase the recycling of TVs and computers from an estimated 17% in 2010, to a target of 30% in 2012-13. By 2021-22 they hope to reach the target of 80% recycle rate, significantly increasing the amount of materials recovered, and reducing the amount of harmful substances entering the environment.

Over time this scheme will replace collection and recycling services provided by local governments, in turn reducing costs for the government and the community. A recent survey estimated that the volume of TVs and computers reaching the end of their useful life is expected to reach 44 million units by 2027-28. We all need to get involved in these schemes and do our part, so the toxic chemicals in the old electronics get dealt with correctly, and cause minimal damage to us and our environment.

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